Ain t no makin it by jay

The dreams of one peer group and the defeatism of the other moved readers, challenged ethnic stereotypes, and suggested how poverty is perpetuated.

Ain t no makin it by jay

I wrote a review of it for class, and thought I would share! Aspirations and Attainment in a Low-Income Neighborhood. The explanations of the life trajectories of the men studied in this book are especially important in light of the inflamed rhetoric and intense debate that characterize the interactions between the two distinct ideologies that have bifurcated the educational reform community.

There are those in this community who believe that school systems alone have the capacity to overcome the achievement gap between rich and poor students. The other ideological camp believe that in order to create better schools, it is imperative to also meet the needs of the community in which that school is situated.

Indeed, schools are a primary mechanism in legitimizing class structures and reproducing class positions. MacLeod reaches these conclusions after conducting a longitudinal ethnography of two groups of boys who come of age in the same housing project.

The first section introduces us to the two groups of boys, all about 17 years old, as they negotiate school and the first forays into the working world. In contrast, the Brothers are predominantly black and have fully bought into the achievement ideology.

While all of the boys attend or attended the same neighborhood high school, their experiences diverge considerably. MacLeod describes how the school is comprised of myriad tracks, presumably created to empower students to choose the course of study that will best prepare them for their future.

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However, we see how without sufficient guidance from school counselors, concerned teachers, or active and knowledgeable parents, the majority of the Hallway Hangers elect to enroll in the least academic track, and many subsequently either are shifted into a special program for students with behavior problems or drop out of school.

On the other hand, the Brothers are typically in more rigorous tracks, more involved in sports, and most importantly, committed to following the rules and obtaining their degrees.

Unlike the Hallway Hangers, the Brothers have higher aspirations for their future, aspirations that include finding stable employment and sustaining a middle class life style. In the end it is through social networks and the personal relationships the men cultivate, either with supportive partners, with their children, or with God, that they are able to attain some semblance of peace and dignity.

Arguably then, attempts at reforming schools in order to increase equity propagated by either of the camps discussed above are problematic. Indeed, schools, as part of the structure that reproduces class, seem poorly equipped to alter structural inequalities.

We could think of a case of individual schools that empower students to have high aspirations; however, the example of the Brothers teaches us that a belief in the achievement ideology does not guarantee future economic success.

Simply expanding the social welfare system, by improving health and human services in addition to supporting schools, does not fundamentally alter the class hierarchy and so will invariably not provide a path to social mobility for the lower class.

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What, then, can educational reformers learn from Aint No Makin It? Despite the lack of concrete policy implications, there are several important lessons to those on either side of the ideological divide within education reform. To ignore how poverty and class are related to how schools function is to discount the lived experiences of lower class students.

Reformers advocating for a multi pronged approach to transforming communities as well as schools should be reminded to take a critical eye to the structures they are expanding. As MacLeod explains, without fundamentally changing the way society is arranged, tinkering on the margins of social programming will be insufficient to alter the lives of lower class students.

Finally, reformers of all stripes should remember the power of individual agency. However constrained by class an individual may be, they have a certain degree of choice in how their life may proceed. Thus, reform should be aimed at increasing the power of personal agency and empowering lower class students to exercise that agency.

Chapter “The Brothers. Finally Finding a Foothold” In chapter 13, author, Jay Macleod summarizes what each brother from Clarendon Heights ends up doing as an occupation and ultimately overall where each ends up and what living situation each ends up in. With the original publication of Ain't No Makin' It, Jay MacLeod brought us to the Clarendon Heights housing project where we met the 'Brothers' and the 'Hallway Hangers'. Their story of poverty, race, and defeatism moved readers and challenged ethnic stereotypes/5(41). With the original publication of Ain’t No Makin’ It Jay MacLeod brought us to the Clarendon Heights housing project where we met the "Brothers" and the "Hallway Hangers". Their story of poverty, race, and defeatism moved listeners and challenged ethnic stereotypes.

A Broader, bolder approach to education:Synopsis. Jay MacLeod brought us to the Clarendon Heights public housing development and introduced us to Jinx and Mokey and their teenage friends-the Hallway Hangers and the Brothers-in with the first edition of Ain't No Makin' It.

Nov 11,  · In Ain't No Making It Jay MacLeod compares two groups of teenage boys in a low-income housing project, the "Hallway Hangers," a group of mainly white boys, and the "Brothers," a group of mostly black caninariojana.com: Resolved. Mar 10,  · MacLeod, Ain’t No Makin’ It Ch.

Posted on March 10, by socg In his book Jay MacLeod examines poverty and why the poor tend to remain poor. He studies two groups of teenagers in a public housing project called Clarendon Heights.

The first group, the Hallway Hangers, were mostly white and did not believe in the. With the original publication of Ain't No Makin' It, Jay MacLeod brought us to the Clarendon Heights housing project where we met the 'Brothers' and the 'Hallway Hangers'.

Their story of poverty, race, and defeatism moved readers and challenged ethnic stereotypes/5(41).

Ain t no makin it by jay

With the original publication of Ain't No Makin' It, Jay MacLeod brought us to the Clarendon Heights housing project where we met the 'Brothers' and the 'Hallway Hangers'.

Their story of poverty, race, and defeatism moved readers and challenged ethnic stereotypes. With the original publication of Ain’t No Makin’ It Jay MacLeod brought us to the Clarendon Heights housing project where we met the "Brothers" and the "Hallway Hangers".

Their story of poverty, race, and defeatism moved listeners and challenged ethnic stereotypes.

Ain’t No Makin’ It Book Review | Daniela Torre | Vanderbilt University